Last updated: July 24. 2013 2:00PM - 96 Views

Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

Ryan Scott Ottney


PDT Staff Writer


The Ohio Department of Education has released more preliminary data from its 2011-12 Local Report Card (LRC), measuring school district performances in the state of Ohio. Of the 12 Scioto County schools graded by the state, six increased their number of state indicators achieved and five dropped; nine increased their Performance Index score and three dropped; and four increased their school rating.


Typically released in August each year, the complete 2011-12 LRCs were delayed this year while the state auditor investigates whether some schools falsified student records, thus, indicated results are subject to revision. Earlier this month, the State Board of Education voted unanimously to release many of the preliminary data elements.


Incomplete data was released earlier this month, but more preliminary results were released this week showing a much broader image.


On its Local Report Cards website, the Ohio Department of Education explains, “During the last few weeks, ODE has worked diligently to upload and verify remaining data for school improvement purposes. As we wait for additional information related to the investigation from the Auditor of State, ODE remains committed to sharing existing data so that students, parents, educators and the public can be informed about the progress of our schools.


“Schools and districts have had access to preliminary student achievement data on standardized assessments throughout the summer. It is time to share this preliminary information with others, with the understanding that the data is not yet final.”


The annual report cards measure a districts performance on state tests, attendance, the number of state indicators achieved by a school district, its Performance Index score, district rating — either Academic Watch, Academic Emergency, Continuous Improvement, Effective, Excellent, or Excellent with Distinction — Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), and Value-Added.


Adequate Yearly Progress measures whether a school is making progress toward goals set by the No Child Left Behind Act based on standardized test performance, attendance and graduation rates for subgroups (special education, minorities) as well as all students.


Value-Added is a statistical measure reflecting whether students are making a full year of progress. The analysis tracks the same student over time and compares his/her test scores over several years. “Above” means students showed more than a year’s worth of academic achievement last year. “Below” means students showed less than a year’s worth of achievement. “Met” means they showed one year of progress.


Bloom-Vernon School District increased the number of state indicators met from 24 in 2010-11, to 25 (of 26) this year. The district also increased its Performance Index score from 100.4 to 101.7, and jumped from Excellent rating last year to Excellent with Distinction this year. The school met its AYP both last year and this year, and was above Value-Added.


Bloom-Vernon Superintendent Rick Carrington was not available to comment on Wednesday.


Clay increased the number of state indicators met from 17 to 22, but dropped its Performance Index score from 95.5 to 95.1. The district did not meet its AYP either this year or last, but did meet Value-Added this year. The school held on to its Effective rating.


Green increased the number of state indicators from 20 to 22, and increased its Performance Index score from 96.4 to 98.1. The district met AYP both last year and this year, and also met Value-Added, but still dropped it state rating from Excellent to Effective.


“We were two-tenth of a point at the high school away (from Excellent). I mean, we were right there,” said Green Superintendent Sandy Mers. “I don’t care what it says, those teachers and those kids are excellent. We’re celebrating, even though it’s disheartening. They did a great job.”


She said the fact that the district could increase its indicators and Performance Index score, meet AYP and Value-Added, and still have its rating downgraded by the state is proof of a flawed system.


“You can see why there’s so much hickack over the report card. I know it started with attendance, but I think it needs to be examined,” Mers said.


Minford increased the number of state indicators from 20 to 22, and increased its Performance Index score from 97.5 to 97.7, but failed to meet AYP this year after meeting it last year. The school was above Value-Added this year, and maintained its Excellent rating.


New Boston dropped in the number of state indicators met this year, from 16 to 15, but increased its Performance Index score from 88.4 to 88.5. The school also met AYP this year, after missing it last year, and met Value-Added this year to hold on to its Continuous Improvement rating.


New Boston Superintendent Mike Staggs was not available to comment on Wednesday.


Northwest dropped in the number of state indicators this year, from 16 to 16, but increased its Performance Index score from 92.2 to 93.0. The school met AYP last year but not this year, and met Value-Added this year to keep its Effective rating.


Portsmouth held steady with 13 state indicators last year and this year, but increased its Performance Index score from 87.2 to 89.1. The district missed AYP last year and this year, and was above Value-Added this year to increase its rating from Continuous Improvement to Effective.


“We’re very pleased. Obviously we still have work to do, but it allows us to at least feel like we’re moving in the right direction. We expected to have more indicators this year, so that part is disappointing. But to improve in 16 different testable areas I thought was very impressive, and what led us to exceeding our Value-Added totals,” said Portsmouth Superintendent Scott Dutey.


He said the district will keep pushing forward, with a goal of moving its Performance Index score above 90 next year and increasing its state indicators to help bump the school from Effective to Excellent.


Valley increased its state indicators from 22 to 23, and its Performance Index score from 97.9 to 100.1, but the district failed to meet AYP this year after doing so last year. The school met Value-Added, and kept its Excellent rating.


Washington-Nile dropped its number of state indicators from 22 to 21, and dropped it Performance Index score from 96.4 to 96.1. The district did not make AYP last year or this year, but met Value-Added this year and remained Effective by the state.


Wheelersburg dropped its number of state indicators from 26 last year to 24 this year, but increased its Performance Index score from 102.3 to 103.2. The district once again missed AYP this year, but was above Value-Added and increased its state rating from Excellent to Excellent with Distinction.


Wheelersburg Superintendent Mark Knapp was not available to comment on Wednesday.


Sciotoville Community School dropped state indicators from 12 (of 22) last year to 10 this year, and also dropped its Performance Index score from 88.4 to 84.5. The school met AYP both last year and this year, met Value-Added this year, and kept its Continuous Improvement rating.


Sciotoville Elementary Academy increased its number of state indicators from 1 (of 5) last year to 2 this year, and increased its Performance Index score from 83.8 to 93.1. The school met AYP both last year and this year, met Value-Added this year, and increased its rating from Continuous Improvement to Effective.


Ryan Scott Ottney can be reached at 740-353-3101, ext. 235, or rottney@heartlandpublications.com.

Comments
comments powered by Disqus


Featured Businesses


Poll



Mortgage Minute