What do do with things


By Frank Lewis - [email protected]



Tina Throckmorton stands next to her handiwork, a barn made out of scrap wood and toy figurines on Ohio 335


“Against the day of prisoners’ ennui, Came dryly forward to the bars again To answer for themselves: Who said it mattered What monkeys did or didn’t understand? They might not understand a burning-glass. They might not understand the sun itself. It’s knowing what to do with things that counts.” – Robert Frost.

Throughout the ages artisans have been people who can create beauty out of the most meaningless things – in other words – it’s knowing what to do with things that counts.”

Tina Throckmorton is an artisan who knows what to do with things, scrap wood, plastic children’s toys, old hinges off of God knows what. Now, she and George Essman have teamed up to create a barn that is both classic and functional. If you go by Essman’s residence on Ohio 335 across from Dixon Mill Road, you will be transported back in time with a barn that, if you open the barn door, holds the newspaper and the U.S. mail.

At the foot of the residence, down at the bottom of a winding driveway, the barn sits proudly on it’s stand. The wood is recycled, some of it from a nearby sawmill, where someone who can see a creation in their mind can put their scraps to good use. From the barn wood look to the shingled roof, to the towering stone chimney and fireplace to horses, cows and other barn animals, it looks like home.

Most notable is a pumpkin at the right front, but that is one of the temporary parts of the barn display.

“For Christmas there will be something Christmas there,” Throckmorton said. “Easter, there will be something Easter there and there will be a turkey at Thanksgiving. Actually, he’ll go on probably this week.”

Throckmorton worked at the Vern Riffe School for several years where it was her pleasure to work with special needs children.

“I loved it,” Throckmorton said. “It was my dream job.”

The job had to take a back seat when her two-year-old grandson got cancer.

“Between taking care of him and everything, because I go with him when he goes to Philadelphia for six weeks for proton radiation,” Throckmorton said. “So I resigned because it wasn’t fair to the staff and the students, so this is what I do to keep my mind busy when we’re not at the hospital.”

It’s easy to see where her heart is.

“What I enjoy most is making things and giving them to people,” Throckmorton said.

It is at that point of the day that George Essman arrives home and it doesn’t take long for him to sing Tina’s praises.

“She’s very talented and very energetic,” Essman said. “She has been doing some painting and different things.”

Essman had to make sure the Daily Times carrier and the postal workers knew where to put the paper and the mail.

“I just got that done yesterday,” Essman said.

So if you’re driving by George Essman’s longtime home up the hill off Ohio 335, slow down and take a look at the art. It just might make your day.

Tina Throckmorton stands next to her handiwork, a barn made out of scrap wood and toy figurines on Ohio 335
http://portsmouth-dailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/web1_Barn1.jpgTina Throckmorton stands next to her handiwork, a barn made out of scrap wood and toy figurines on Ohio 335

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By Frank Lewis

[email protected]

Reach Frank Lewis at 740-353-3101, ext. 1928, or on Twitter @franklewis.

Reach Frank Lewis at 740-353-3101, ext. 1928, or on Twitter @franklewis.

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